Saturday, February 02, 2019

Suffocating Silence



There’s now a company that sells oxygen tanks and masks for brachycephalic dogs.

And the folks who sell CPAP machines for humans use an English Bulldog to illustrate their product.

A very special thanks to the Westminster and Crufts dog shows, and to Kennel Club dog breeders generally, for helping make this happen.

Your silence and acquiescence are as important as your registration fees
.

3 comments:

Garnet said...

I was reading Air Canada's regulations on shipping animals, and they will not accept brachycephalic dogs or cats for air transport at all, no matter the weather conditions. Too many of them start to have breathing troubles, even if it isn't hot. They tested dogs under normal weather conditions, and still deemed transporting them too high risk.

I feel bad for these poor dogs. They can't breathe properly under conditions that normal dogs can handle.

Sale Ringgold said...

I viewed the website and do not see where the oxygen is being touted for bracycephalic breeds. In the case of my elderly dog who was in heart failure his last couple of months, having oxygen if he was having a hard time was very helpful so that his breathing could be supported while an extra dose of Lasix worked to take off the extra fluid. Additionally, as a breeder, oxygen has been critical in helping get struggling puppies going who might otherwise not have made it.

PBurns said...

YES, oxygen is a very useful thing sub-weight puppies. Agreed. In those cases, an oxydent cannister is generally hooked up to a warm box as we do with children's incubators.

Oxygen is a commodity; it is sold over the counter, on Amazon, and does not need a veterinary prescription.

The market here is for vets to prescribe to patients with chronic problems. Some of those are going to be geriatric dogs, but most are going to look a lot like this dog in the picture at the bottom of this page >> https://pawprintoxygen.com/faq/

English Bulldogs, Pugs, Frenchies, and Boston Terriers are now among the most common breeds and all have a predictible rate of BOAS.