Monday, September 27, 2010

Deformity and Defect as Sales Opportunity

A pet insurance company I have never heard of, called Trupanion, and billing itself as "North America’s fastest growing pet insurance company" has "released the top five most expensive dog breeds, based on pet insurance claims submitted by Trupanion policyholders since August 12, 2000."

The top five most expensive dog breeds, according to Trupanion:
  1. English Bulldog – This breed is prone to cherry eye, brachycephalic syndrome, elongated soft palate, hip dysplasia, patellar luxation, and stenotic nares. The total amount spent on this breed was $1,152,947.32, with 84% related to illnesses and 16% related to accidents. The average claim amount is $370.57.
  2. Bernese Mountain Dog – This breed is prone to cataracts, elbow dysplasia, gastric torsion, and mast cell tumors. The total amount spent on this breed was $553,660.57, with 76% associated with illnesses and 24% associated with accidents. The average claim amount is $412.85.
  3. Rottweiler – Health conditions associated with this breed are allergies, elbow dysplasia, gastric torsion, and hypothyroidism. Trupanion policyholders have spent $532,261.93 on this breed, 63% for illnesses and 37% for accidents. The average claim amount is $567.53.
  4. Great Dane – Common health issues for this breed are cardiomyopathy, elbow dysplasia, gastric torsion, and hip dysplasia. The total amount spent on this breed was $462,204.97, with 77% associated with illnesses and 23% associated with accidents. The average claim amount is $385.49.
  5. French Bulldog – This breed is prone to allergies, brachycephalic syndrome, hip dysplasia, and stenotic nares. According to Trupanion databases, policyholders have spent $384,325.78 on this breed, with 87% associated with illnesses and 13% associated with accidents. The average claim amount is $355.63.
The press release goes on, with Howard Rubin, Chief Operating Officer at Trupanion saying:  "We encourage everyone to enroll their pets early to ensure that expensive veterinary costs are covered.”

Right.

Any admonition to stay away from deformed, defective and diseased kennel club breeds alltogether?

Nope.  A deadly silence there.

Got it.  Thanks for sharing!
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3 comments:

The Doubtful Guest said...

Any admonition to stay away from deformed, defective and diseased kennel club breeds all together?

Well, that wouldn't be very good business, would it?

And I doubt it would matter, anyway. Sadly.

Th truth needs to get out, but you can bet insurers aren't going to be the ones getting it out.

Viatecio said...

Hm, top five list includes two brachycephalic dwarves and three giant breeds.

Just pointing that out, in case no one else saw the pattern. After all, everyone ELSE'S bulldog, Rottie, Berner, etc is healthy as can be, right?

Sad thing is, I'm very taken with Rottweilers.

On another note and while I'm on Rotties, I found this on one breeder's page. While she does show with the AKC, her breeding practices and ethics give me a little bit of hope. Her dogs' jobs are to be pets first, show dogs second, and best of all, she breeds for HEALTH and makes her dogs' health scores available online for all to see.

Seahorse said...

Geez, I wonder if the bull dog breeders culled first by simply allowing the dogs to breed and whelp without human intervention, if that would be a start in strengthening their breed? If nothing else, there'd be fewer of the poor beasts.

Seahorse