Thursday, May 28, 2015

Big Profit in Sheep Drench for Dogs


Ivermectin sheep drench contains a 0.08 percent solution of Ivermectin and it does not have to be diluted. Given orally to dogs, it provides all the active ingredients you need to "prevent" heartworm or treat mange, ear mites, round worms, and hook worms. Ivermectin has a very broad “margin of error” or safety margin, and so doubling or even tripling the dose given here will do no harm except in certain rare bloodlines of Shelties, Collies, and a few other breeds with an inherited susceptibility to Ivermectin toxicity.
  • Up to 14 pounds: -- given 0.05 ml or or 1 drop from an eye dropper, assuming 20 drops per ml)
  • 15 to 29 pounds: 0.1 ml (two drops)
  • 30 to 58 pounds: 0.2 ml (four drop)
  • 59 to 88 pounds: 0.3 ml (6 drops)
  • 89 to 117 pounds: 0.4 ml (8 drops)
  • 118 to 147 pounds: 0.5 ml (10 drops)

An 8 oz bottle of Ivermectin sheep drench can be bought for $40 and it contains enough Ivermectin to give 4,720 doses to a terrier. To put it another way, if I dosed my dogs every month during warm weather (a maximum of 8 months around here),  this bottle would last me 590 years of coverage for one dog.

There is a good business to be made by simply buying $40 worth of Ivermectin sheep drench and repackaging it in 40 eye drop bottles and selling it $15 a bottle. The 118 terrier-sized doses in each $15 bottle would last a person with three terrier-sized dogs 5 years! And the profit for repackaging those 40 bottles, and relabeling them. would be about $500 for just a few minutes work. Ka-Ching!

4 comments:

PipedreamFarm said...

The doses you have listed are based upon the minimum effective dose (determined decades ago) for the maximum weight in each group. My only concern is the ability of the general population to accurately measure volumes to ensure that at least the minimum effective dose is always provided.

Readily available literature on the safety of ivermectin indicates no adverse reactions up to 10x the effective minimum dose, even in dogs with the MDR1 mutation (pharmaceutical companies were aware of certain breeds' sensitivity to this drug decades before the mutation was identified).

Based upon concerns in measuring volume and literature suggesting there has been an increase in the "loss of effectiveness" in heartworm preventatives (two proposed causes are development of resistance and increased infective dose in mosquito populations) we dose at about 3x the minimum effective dose.

Doubling your listed volumes would provide 2x the minimum effective dose at the maximum weight in each range and 4x at the minimum weight Additionally, 1cc (mL) syringes are readily available on-line and will be much more accurate in volume dispensing than a dropper.

PipedreamFarm said...

links to literature on developing resistance to heartworm "preventatives"

http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/s13071-014-0494-6.pdf
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304401715001727

W.Va.Steve said...

How much longer after the expiration date is it effective to use worm medicine?

PBurns said...

Sheep drench is good for two years according to the label, but in fact it's good for twice that or more. Expiration dates are voluntary and there are no expiration dates for insecticides, which tend to remain toxic for a very long time if kept out of light and heat.

Expiration dates are basically a scam across the board. Bread, fruit and fresh meat go obviously bad, but antibiotics, canned food and most insecticides are basically good for 10 years or better. The fall off with both insecticides and antibiotics is gradual and a very slight increase in dose tends to not create harm and counter balance the slight decline in efficacy. I have written quite a bit about antibiotics and expiration dates elsewhere on the blog, but the bottom line is that canned food, antibiotic and poison makers (herbicides, insecticides, fungacides) use expiration dates as a marketing tool -- they want you to throw away the good in order to buy more. Works too!